Hunter Legend 38 for sale

San Mateo, CA, United States

£81,149GBP
Listed price $114,000 USD

Hunter Legend 38 - Manufacturer Provided Image: Hunter 38
General information
Make/model
Hunter Legend 38
Category
Used sail boat for sale
Price
£81,149 GBP | Listed price $114,000 USD
Year
2007
Designer
Glenn Henderson
Length overall
11.66 metres
Length waterline
9.91 metres
Beam
3.81 metres
Draft
1.96 metres
Displacement
6,917 kg
Location
San Mateo, CA, United States

About this Hunter Legend 38

English

Only the second owner! VERY CLEAN and well maintained! Bottom painted and engine serviced one year ago. portable w/remote Bow thruster, new batteries, water and bilge pump. In 2005 the Hunter 38 won a coveted Cruising World Boat of the Year!see article in descriptions.

Manufacturer Provided Description


The Hunter 38 was designed as an exceptionally comfortable cruiser with outstanding performance and easy handling. The Hunter 38's sail plan features a large roach mainsail with flaking system and an anodized B&R double spreader fractional rig with struts on a conventional mast, or the easy-to-sail Selden furling system. Coupled with either sail plan, the Hunter 38's new stainless steel rudder design delivers exceptional power that is more aerodynamically efficient and responsive when under way. Interior comfort rules in the Hunter 38, thanks to the dedicated effort of our team of interior designers and stylists. Spaciousness is achieved by the 6'6" tall cabin ceiling framed in solid teak, which is balanced by an Everwear laminate teak-and-holly sole. An extra large salon, master stateroom with en suite head, guest stateroom with V-berth, full-service galley and dedicated nav station all work together onboard the Hunter 38 to create a functional interior living environment.

Cruising World Review from June 2005


As we stepped aboard the new Hunter 38 last fall in Annapolis, something seemed different. At first glance, all of Hunter's trademark details were there: the stainless-steel arch that carries the mainsheet traveler, the comprehensive bimini, the corner seats in the stern rail. Yet the hollow waterlines and fine bow sections indicated that designer Glenn Henderson and his team had refined the Hunter hull form to bring out more pep and agility. Henderson's written brief for the boat describes a "very responsive and maneuverable yacht that would be very forgiving to sail in a breeze and easy to maneuver in close quarters such as docking." He highlighted two performance-related objectives: to minimize the pitching motion and improve boat speed in midrange conditions, and to boost the boat's pointing ability with a low-drag keel and a large rudder that helps generate lift. All these attributes needed to be wrapped into a package that offered exceptional comfort and easy handling and that was suitable for shorthanded sailing and for newcomers who might like to explore Catalina, Martha's Vineyard, or the Bahamas.
Cruising World's Boat of the Year judges immediately picked up on the look and feel during the dockside inspection, which revealed well-conceived ideas and good execution, all focused on the purpose of the vessel and the target audience. "I'm more impressed with this than with any other Hunter I've seen," said Steve Callahan, a BOTY judge whose career background includes boatbuilding and yacht design.

Hunter builds the hull with balsa-cored sandwich above the waterline and solid glass with Kevlar reinforcements below. It's a cost-effective and proven method that keeps weight down and increases impact resistance where it matters. The deck is bonded to the hull and through-bolted on an outward flange. Hunter protects the hull/deck joint from bumps and bruises with a stainless steel-capped vinyl rubrail. The lead/antimony keel is connected to the structural hull grid with stainless-steel bolts. The test boat had the shallow-draft version, with a bulb that keeps the center of gravity low without creating excessive drag. Augmenting the efficiency of the lateral plane is a large, balanced spade rudder that has a composite stock.
Hunter continually talks to its customers; based upon those conversations, comfort, low maintenance, and ease of use figure prominently on its boats. Molded-in nonskid surfaces on deck are complemented by low-maintenance Flexiteek surfaces on the cockpit seats. Precut into sheets and precaulked, this material might not meet the aesthetic standards of dyed-in-the-wool traditionalists, but it's easy to replace at the end of its useful life, which, according to Hunter, is expected to be about 15 years.
What registered with the BOTY judges was Hunter's attention to important details, which put the 386 a step ahead of other boats in the same category. "The chocks and cleats were fine, the emergency steering was very functional, deck flow and handholds were good," noted BOTY judge Alvah Simon. "The anchoring drills went very well. The 386 has twin rollers that can both be used, and everything worked properly. There was a cleat behind the fairlead of the port roller and a pin placement on the roller; you can quickly lock down the anchor until everything's set up right. The well was good, and the electric windlass had up/down switches, which you don't expect in this price range."

As with other Hunters, the integrated stainless-steel arch and bimini over the cockpit is a defining trait. While the judges felt that mounting the traveler track on top of this arch removed clutter from the cockpit, they all agreed that the canvas bimini could be improved with more see-through panels to give a better view of the sails.
Aside from this issue, which also surfaced on several other boats, the cockpit was a good workplace, once one got used to the concept of reaching up for traveler adjustments. Kibitzers sat in the corner seats on the stern rail, watching the skipper work the Lewmar folding wheel and the crew trim the sails at the self-tailing winches. The primaries were mounted well aft, so the cockpit layout satisfied an important requirement for safe shorthanded sailing: easy access to the sheets for the person at the helm so he or she doesn't have to step away from the wheel to execute a tack or an emergency maneuver.

As with other Hunters, the integrated stainless-steel arch and bimini over the cockpit is a defining trait. While the judges felt that mounting the traveler track on top of this arch removed clutter from the cockpit, they all agreed that the canvas bimini could be improved with more see-through panels to give a better view of the sails.
Aside from this issue, which also surfaced on several other boats, the cockpit was a good workplace, once one got used to the concept of reaching up for traveler adjustments. Kibitzers sat in the corner seats on the stern rail, watching the skipper work the Lewmar folding wheel and the crew trim the sails at the self-tailing winches. The primaries were mounted well aft, so the cockpit layout satisfied an important requirement for safe shorthanded sailing: easy access to the sheets for the person at the helm so he or she doesn't have to step away from the wheel to execute a tack or an emergency maneuver.

As with other Hunters, the integrated stainless-steel arch and bimini over the cockpit is a defining trait. While the judges felt that mounting the traveler track on top of this arch removed clutter from the cockpit, they all agreed that the canvas bimini could be improved with more see-through panels to give a better view of the sails.
Aside from this issue, which also surfaced on several other boats, the cockpit was a good workplace, once one got used to the concept of reaching up for traveler adjustments. Kibitzers sat in the corner seats on the stern rail, watching the skipper work the Lewmar folding wheel and the crew trim the sails at the self-tailing winches. The primaries were mounted well aft, so the cockpit layout satisfied an important requirement for safe shorthanded sailing: easy access to the sheets for the person at the helm so he or she doesn't have to step away from the wheel to execute a tack or an emergency maneuver.

Making his way into the saloon, judge Bill Lee noted that the first step of the companionway was deep, well sized, and properly surfaced with nonskid. "A big top step is really nice because people like to stand in the hatch," he said.

 

Belowdecks, the emphasis on practicality and comfort is evident in the laminated Everwear teak & holly-look alike sole, which is designed to withstand abuse much better than actual teak & holly, and without fuss or varnish. Headroom in the main saloon is a generous 6 feet 6 inches. On the inside of the cabin top, Hunter uses a light headliner that offers easy access to deck hardware and wiring and helps keep the center of gravity low. The living space is divided between the dinette to starboard and a settee to port, ahead of the forward-facing nav station. BOTY judges noted that the saloon table lacked fiddles, but the separate stall shower in the head to port of the companionway drew praise. Lee, a noted yacht designer in his own right, pointed out that in this size of boat, designers usually have to make a choice: "It's either a forward-facing nav station, in which case the skipper wins," he quipped, "or it's a separate shower stall, in which case the first mate wins. Here, both of them win."
Both settees in the saloon can be converted into sea berths, at least in theory. The L-shaped galley to starboard pleased judge Tom Prior, who has a background in professional food service: "This is one of the few smaller boats we saw that had two stainless-steel sinks. I think that's real positive." Still, he would have preferred a properly gimbaled three-burner stove instead of the two-burner model installed on the test boat. He appreciated the easy access to the bronze through-hulls under the galley floorboards. "They're all in one compartment and have proper labels," he said. "If you hear water sloshing in the bilge, you look here first to see where it could be coming from."

 

The master cabin in the owner's version is aft, dominated by an athwartship double berth, two lounge seats, and private access to the head and shower. Hunter also offers a three-cabin layout with two staterooms aft. Bill Lee was smitten with this part of the boat. "The aft cabin was very well-done for a 38-foot boat," he said. "I liked the passageways on both sides because such an arrangement it really helps the ventilation."

Peeking underneath the floorboards, he noted something else: "The engine has the old-fashioned shaft drive with the old-fashioned stuffing box, which is much easier to repair than a saildrive."
The positive impression the judges had of the Hunter 38 at the dock was reinforced when the time came to take a spin on Chesapeake Bay. The test boat had three of what Bill Lee calls "performance inhibitors": a 5-foot shallow-draft keel, a fixed three-bladed propeller, and an in-mast mainsail furling system. And yet, under the three-point Bergstrom & Ridder rig the boat moved at a good clip on all points of sail, even in light air. "Hunter is really consistent with this concept," Steve Callahan said of the mainsail-driven rig featuring swept-aft spreaders and a small blade jib. "It's good for Hunter's envisioned customers, including sailing couples and novices, who benefit from the easy handling of a small headsail." Callahan also praised the feeling at the helm. "The boat performed extremely well under main alone, and it also was incredibly maneuverable."

During a chance encounter with a J/80 that sailed along behind us, he noted that we were "doing basically the same speed." Measured speed over ground averaged 4.5 knots under main alone, 5.8 knots closehauled with a headsail, and close to 7 knots on a beam reach, all in about 10 knots of true wind. And under engine alone, the boat kept up its good manners and maneuverability. With the optional 40-horsepower Yanmar, it managed an average speed over ground of roughly 6.5 knots at 2,500 rpm and 7.2 knots at 3,000 rpm.
In the end, the hunch about the Hunter 38 proved to be correct. Hands down, the boat convinced the judges that it was the unanimous choice to win the class of production cruisers under 40 feet. It did it with better-than-expected performance, good design ideas, and follow-through in their execution. "Hunter is getting better design, better construction, and has price control," Alvah Simon said in summary. "I enjoyed sailing the boat, and I think other people are going to as well."

Cruising World, June 2005, Dieter Loibner

 

 

 

 

Accommodations


Guest suite with V-berth and ensuite sink forward with pass-through to salon next aft. Salon has L shaped dinette starboard with straight settee and nav table port.

Continue aft to J-shaped galley starboard, head with separate shower port which accesses beam-to-beam master stateroom aft with athwartship queen berth. Master also accessed starboard side aft of galley.

Note teak interior looks and smells new, 6'5 headroom, teak & holly sole, tastefully decorated in muted off white.

Galley


Twin deep stainless steel sinks with designer one-touch faucet and Corian countertops, Force 10 gimballed three burner propane stove with oven, built in Origo microwave oven, top-loading refrigerator with separate freezer compartment, built in trash can. Bemis electric fresh water flush head.

Sails and Rigging


Fractionally rigged 110% jib on Furlex roller furler, Dacron in-mast furling mainsail, Selden aluminum mast with double swept back spreaders (Hunters trademark B&R rig), Selden rigid vang, Harken mainsheet and traveller attached to stainless steel arch over the cockpit which also incorporates the bimini top. Three #40 Lewmar self tailing winches, single #44 Lewmar self tailer, all lines lead aft through eight labelled Spinlock rope clutches, inboard adjustable jib cars.

Rigging


  • Anodized B&R Double Spreader Fractional Rig w/Mast Struts ? Selden?
  • Boom Vang
  • Dual Single Line Reefing System
  • Large Roach Main w/Flaking System
  • 110% Furling Jib w/Acrylic Suncover
  • Jib Furling System
  • Adjustable Mainsheet Traveler on Arch
  • Inboard Jib Tracks w/Adjustable Cars
  • Internal Halyards Led to Cockpit
  • Mainsail Cover ? Hunter Pac
  • (2) Sets Line Stoppers and Organizers
  • (2) Two-Speed Self-Tailing Rigging Winches
  • (2) Two-Speed Self-Tailing Jib Sheet Winches
  • (2) Winch Handles
  • Windex? Wind Vane

Sail Area



Working Sail Area : 840.66 sq ft

Electronics and Navigation Gear


Full suite of Raymarine electronics: C80 color chartplotter with radar overlay at helm and RN300 chartplotter at nav table, ST6001 autopilot, wind speed/direction indicator, knot meter, depth sounder. Icom VHF radio, Danforth compass. Sharp Aquous flat panel tv/dvd player, Sony AM/FM/CD player.

Engine


Yanmar three cylinder fresh water cooled diesel engine

CLEAN and well maintained

Model 3JH4E

40 hp

765 hours

 

Electrical System


110V AC / 12V DC. Thirty amp shorepower service, Xantrex inverter/charger, three 12V batteries in two banks with parallel switch.

Emergency Tiller, Danforth anchor line and Smoke detectors


  • Danforth-Type Anchor and Line
  • Automatic Engine Room Fire Extinguishing System
  • Carbon Monoxide and Smoke Detectors
  • Emergency Tiller

Galley Details #2


  • AC Electrical Outlets
  • Built-in Dish Storage Cabinet with Fan and Light
  • Built-In Waste Bin
  • Double Stainless Sinks
  • Genuine Corian? Countertops
  • 2 Burner LPG, Gimbaled Stove w/Oven
  • Handrails
  • Galley Splash Guard
  • Microwave
  • (6) Plates, Bowls & Mugs
  • Storage Cabinets and Drawers
  • Front Loading Refrigerator

AC/DC - electronics - tankage


  • AC/ DC Switch Panel
  • AM/FM Stereo/CD Player with (2) Speakers
  • 60 Amp Alternator
  • Battery Charger ? 30 Amp
  • Cabin Reading Lights
  • Dockside Power w/Cord
  • Dual 12-Volt Battery Switches
  • Electric Automatic Bilge Pump
  • 34 Gallon (129 L) Waste Holding Tank w/Macerator
  • 75 Gallon (284 L) Water Capacity
  • 35 Gallon (132 L) Fuel Capacity
  • 5 Gallon (19 L) Electric Water Heater
  • Hot/Cold Pressure Water System
  • Navigation Light Package
  • Raymarine? ST40 Digital Depthsounder w/Alarm
  • Raymarine? ST40 Digital Knotmeter w/Log Shower Sump Pump
  • Tank Gauges ? Fuel, Water & Waste
  • VHF Radio w/Stainless Antenna

Deck/Hull


  • Anchor Well for Rode and Chain
  • Anchor Rollers ? Dual Offset
  • Balanced Spade Rudder
  • (6) Stainless Steel Bow, Stern and Spring Cleats
  • Bronze Seacocks w/Thru-Hulls Below Waterline
  • Cabin Windshield
  • Balsa-Cored Hull Sides, Solid FRP Bottom and Structural Grid Reinforcement
  • Dorade Vent
  • Double Lifelines w/3 Gates
  • (2) Fixed Hull Ports
  • Keel: 6'5" Draft Antimonious Lead 
  • LPG Tank Storage for Two Bottles
  • (5) Opening Deck Hatches w/Screens
  • (6) Six Opening Ports w/Screens
  • 360? Rubrail w/Stainless Steel Insert
  • Maxguard Gelcoats for UV Protection
  • HKT Kevlar? Hull Reinforcement
  • Flexiteek Inserts on Cockpit Seats
  • Molded-In Nonskid Walking Surfaces
  • Stainless Steel Bow Pulpit
  • Stainless Stern Rail w/Seats & Drink Holders
  • Stainless Steel Cockpit Arch w/Traveler
  • Stainless Steel Telescoping Ladder
  • Stainless Steel Stem Fitting
  • Through-Bolted Hull/Deck Joint
  • Two Transom Storage Lockers

Options


  • Air Conditioning (DOES NOT HAVE A/C) space under settee to add unit.
  • Aluminum Boom Vang YES
  • Bimini Top Blue Sunbrella DOES HAVE Bimini cover.
  • Cruising Spinnaker Gear YES
  • Diesel Generator NO 
  • Electric Anchor Windlass YES
  • Electric Self-Tailing Halyard Winch NO
  • Engine Upgrade to 40hp (29.6kw) YES
  • Extended Wheel Guard w/Large Instrument Pod YES
  • 15" Flat Panel TV w/Bose 3.2.1 Entertainment System YES
  • High Bilgewater Alarm and Pump YES
  • In-Mast Furling System w/Rigid Vang YES
  • Innerspring Mattress
  • Inverter
  • Interior Cushions
  • Quiet Flush Head
  • Raymarine ST290 Basic Package
  • Raymarine ST290 Premier Package
  • Raymarine Autopilots
  • Raymarine GPS
  • Raymarine ST60 WindMachine
  • Remote Mike for VHF
  • Removable Dinette Table Leaf 
  • Spinnaker Winches
  • ST60 Knot/Depth Upgrade
  • 13" Flat Panel TV w/DVD Player
  • Three-Blade Prop YES

Cockpit/Transom/Steering - additional descriptions


  • Halyard Stowage Wells
  • Cockpit Storage Locker
  • Integral Cockpit Grabrail & Fold-Out Table
  • Hinging Helmsman Seat
  • Hot/Cold Transom Shower
  • Manual Bilge Pump - High Volume
  • Steering Pedestal with Single Lever Engine Control, Wheel Brake, Lighted Compass, Handrail, and Drink Holders
  • Walk-Through Transom w/Swim Platform

Electronics

Shore power inlet, Inverter

Outside Equipment

Swimming ladder, Cockpit shower, Electric windlass

Other Equipment

Quisqueya, Furling mainsail, Furling genoa, Asymmetric spinnaker, Steering wheel

Read more

Propulsion
Engine
Yanmar 3JH4E
Engine hours
765
Fuel
Diesel
Fuel capacity
132 litres
Accommodation
Number of cabins
2
Number of berths
4
Drinking water capacity
284 litres
This Hunter Legend 38 has been viewed 65 times
Broker/Dealer Information

Richard Boland Yacht Sales

Mr. Richard Boland
1070 Marina Village Parkw
Suite 107 Alameda
California
94501
United States
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